Tuesday’s Tip – Unsuccessfully organising Myself Part II

Following on from my failure to keep myself organised – the second certificate I ordered was a marriage certificate for my other Great-Grandfather on my paternal line,William Frederick Freeman.

The son of George Frederick Freeman, William married Elizabeth Ann Wood on Christmas day 1902. This certificate confirms their marriage date, which I hadn’t known before and also that Elizabeth’s father was Mark Wood, who had died before the marriage took place. One of the witnesses was Phoebe Wood, a possible sister for Elizabeth.

This is really helpful as I’d previously made a mistake with Elizabeth Wood’s parents. I’d found a likely entry for her in the census, both the age and area fitted, so I had assumed (I know, dangerous genealogy term!) I’d found her and her parents. Following the release of the 1911 census, I looked up William and Elizabeth; they were living on Burton Road in Overseal, Derbyshire. Elizabeth’s place of birth was given as Worthing in Hampshire, so she obviously had no link to the Derbyshire family I had assumed were hers!

But having Elizabeth’s father’s name and a possible sister will hopefully make it possible to find the correct family for her and follow them further back.

The Nottingham Jowetts

Following my discoveries in Basford cemetery I took advantage of the PDF trial at the GRO (General Register Office) to order the marriage certificate of my Great-Great-Grandmother Theresa Bates and her second husband John Hallam.

The certificate proved my Grandmother was correct about Theresa’s remarriage; her given name is Jowett & her father’s name is Peter Bates which fits with previous certificates I have found for her.

Hallam & Bates marriage

Theresa’s residence at the time of this marriage was 88 Stanley Road Nottingham; she was living with her son Charles, known as Harold, Jowett & his wife, Florence. They’d only been married for two years, so I wonder what Florence thought to having her mother-in-law living with them?!

I’m now waiting for three further certificates relating to this branch of my family tree so hopefully they will back up the information I’ve already found.

Mystery Monday – The Jowetts in Basford Cemetery

I haven’t done a great deal of research into the Jowett side of my family up to yet, other than a basic gathering of names from the Census and a handful of certificates.

Browsing in the Nottinghamshire Archives some time ago I came across a memorial inscription in Basford cemetery, Nottingham for my 2x Great-grandparents Edmund Jowett and his wife Theresa (nee Bates). It records the deaths of Edmund in 1908, his wife Theresa in 1932 and two of their sons, Thomas and Henry, who sadly both died at the age of five just over a year apart.

I was puzzled by the reference to Theresa as I can 270d6a1964b744cf0682321e3b9518bd600c47d67e6945f888ed6a08c827fa38remember my Grandmother telling me that Theresa had remarried and that she “wasn’t a Jowett when she died.” I assumed (never a good thing in genealogy!) that Theresa had been buried under the name Jowett and had therefore not remarried at all. Also all four burials share the same reference number: 1185 so I’d assumed (again!) that they were in the same grave.

I’d put this to one side and not followed up with any more research, but a couple of weeks ago I began to search the actual burial records for Basford, looking for any of my ancestors names. I found an Edmund Jowett (died 1908) and a Theresa Hallam (died 1932) in grave 4 of section F1. Theresa had purchased the grave in perpetuity Further on I found Thomas (died 1880) and Henry Jowett (died 1881) in grave 34, section K3.

I thought at first I’d got the wrong family in the memorial inscriptions, but on checking all the dates of death match up and there is no other family in Nottingham with the same names in the census records. I’ve also found a marriage between a Theresa Jowett and John Hallam in Nottingham in 1914 which helps tie things together.

However, I still don’t understand the differences in the records, so I’ll be asking for some help next time I’m at the Nottinghamshire Family History Society meeting as well as ordering the relevant certificates to back up what I hope I’ve found. A visit to Basford Cemetery may also be on the cards!

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Thrifty Thursday – Free Ancestry Access

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Have you got anything planned for the Easter weekend? How about taking advantage of Ancestry’s free access weekend and finding your ancestor’s records for free?

 

From 14-17 April, you’ll be able to search millions of UK, Ireland and Commonwealth records – all completely free*. Start in Britain then head off to Australia, Canada, or wherever, and spend four full days finding long-lost family all over the Commonwealth.

UK Census collection
Search for ancestors across the generations using census records from 1841-1911.

Birth, marriage and death indexes
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Get access to everything from Australian Electoral Rolls to Canadian Census records.

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*Access to the records in the featured collections will start on 14 April and be free until 17 April, 2017 at 23:59 BST. After the free access period ends, you will only be able to view the records in the featured collections using an Ancestry.co.uk Worldwide paid membership

Motivation Monday – New Freeman Research

I recently received an email from a distant cousin. We’d been in touch briefly a few years ago and he has been continuing his research into the Freeman family. We’ve never been able to prove our Freeman branches are on the same tree, but it piqued my interest enough to revisit my own research.

I’d only got back as far as my 3x great-grandfather William Freeman, who, according to the census records had been born around 1816 in Burton-on-Trent. The census also revealed that his wife was called Sarah and he worked as a blacksmith in Overseal on the Leicestershire/Derbyshire border. I’ve found four children for them so far; Sarah Jane born 1844, Anne born 1847, William Carey born 1848 and my direct ancestor George Frederick born 1853.

 

My distant cousin had previously found the marriage of William and Sarah so I ordered the certificate and learnt that Sarah was the daughter of John Coulton, a labourer from Netherseal. William was the son of another William, a shoemaker living in Overseal. They had married in the Baptist chapel in Ashby-de-la-Zouch in October 1841 so I knew I would need to search the non-conformist records.

Searching on Find My Past  I eventually found William’s baptism which was held at the High Street Independent chapel in Burton-on-Trent in February 1816. Unfortunately there is no mention of his mother’s name or his father’s first name but it does give his father’s occupation as shoemaker which fits in nicely with the marriage certificate. and also suggests that William Snr wasn’t a permanent Burton resident.

Unfortunately there appears to be some information missing from the left of the document, possibly William’s actual date of birth. The copy I requested from the Lichfield Archives also didn’t have this information so the next step would be The National Archives in London where the original registers are kept.

But I think I’m happy with what I’ve found so far – I can now check the census records for both parents of William Freeman and Sarah Coulton and try to follow them forwards as well as backwards.

Picture Credit: https://unsplash.com/search/blacksmith?photo=66-xshuH0N0

Motivation Monday – Top Ten for 2016-17

I posted this list in January last year, so I thought I’d revisit it to see how I’d got on.

1.    Finish searching the French online records for my Oldham family in Calais. The Census and Birth/Marriage/Death records are all freely available online. I’ve found the family in 1866, but also need to look further back to see if the previous generation spent time there and also if any of them went to Australia. I’ve completed searching the years 1841, 1851, 1861, 1866, 1872 and have begun 1836. I’ve also checked the Oldham family research I’ve done so far & found a discrepancy which I need to check further.  So until I’ve done this I won’t be starting items 2, 3, or 4 on this list. So until I’ve done this I won’t be starting items 2, 3, or 4 on this list.😒
2.    Transcribe sections of Joseph Woolley’s diary and finish reading/copying the remainder at the Nottingham Archives. Continuing with the Oldham family, but this time in Clifton, Nottinghamshire. Joseph Woolley was a framework knitter from Clifton, as well as his own business his diary documents he commented on his neighbours and local events. I need to transcribe the pages I’ve already photographed and finish reading the remaining sections in the Archives. Not started yet.
3.    Finish checking the Methodist records at the Nottinghamshire Archives. I’m mostly looking for Oldhams in these records, but other family names have cropped up too. Not started yet.
4.   Make use of the Nottinghamshire Family History Society’s research room. To find more Oldham information, specifically Thomas Oldknow Oldham’s birth/baptism around 1834. Also check their online databases. I’ve searched here for Thomas’s baptism & cant find it it any Nottinghamshire registers. So I may try Derbyshire Archives as a couple of census returns suggest he may have been born in Sawley or Smalley.
5.    Finish reading Percy Richardson’s war diary and finish the blog posts. Done! ✅ 😊
6.    Tidy and reorganise documents, certificate and books. Before ordering any more! Done! ✅😊
7.    Check out parish records on Find My Past. Look for my May family in Frant, Sussex from 1600 working backwards. Started this
8.   Visit some local churchyards to look for gravestones. Sawley, Moira, Donisthorpe, Church Wilne, Draycott, Basford, Ashby-de-la-Zouch & others aren’t too far away to visit and record any memorial inscriptions. Not started – must make more effort! 😞
9.    Look for tithe maps and census information for Pilsley. To find out who lived in and/or owned my late father-in-law’s farmhouse. I now have copies of the deeds going back to 1901 and have researched one of the owners via the census. It appears the owner later passed the property on to his son, so he’s the next individual to research.
10. Start scanning photos. I received a Doxie Flip as a Christmas present so I’m intending to scan and share many of my photos. I’ve scanned quite a few family photos & shared them via Dropbox with family members. I’ve also started scanning and sharing Auntie Joy’s photo albums. This is ongoing though – and will take me some time.