The Nottingham Jowetts

Following my discoveries in Basford cemetery I took advantage of the PDF trial at the GRO (General Register Office) to order the marriage certificate of my Great-Great-Grandmother Theresa Bates and her second husband John Hallam.

The certificate proved my Grandmother was correct about Theresa’s remarriage; her given name is Jowett & her father’s name is Peter Bates which fits with previous certificates I have found for her.

Hallam & Bates marriage

Theresa’s residence at the time of this marriage was 88 Stanley Road Nottingham; she was living with her son Charles, known as Harold, Jowett & his wife, Florence. They’d only been married for two years, so I wonder what Florence thought to having her mother-in-law living with them?!

I’m now waiting for three further certificates relating to this branch of my family tree so hopefully they will back up the information I’ve already found.

Mystery Monday – The Jowetts in Basford Cemetery

I haven’t done a great deal of research into the Jowett side of my family up to yet, other than a basic gathering of names from the Census and a handful of certificates.

Browsing in the Nottinghamshire Archives some time ago I came across a memorial inscription in Basford cemetery, Nottingham for my 2x Great-grandparents Edmund Jowett and his wife Theresa (nee Bates). It records the deaths of Edmund in 1908, his wife Theresa in 1932 and two of their sons, Thomas and Henry, who sadly both died at the age of five just over a year apart.

I was puzzled by the reference to Theresa as I can 270d6a1964b744cf0682321e3b9518bd600c47d67e6945f888ed6a08c827fa38remember my Grandmother telling me that Theresa had remarried and that she “wasn’t a Jowett when she died.” I assumed (never a good thing in genealogy!) that Theresa had been buried under the name Jowett and had therefore not remarried at all. Also all four burials share the same reference number: 1185 so I’d assumed (again!) that they were in the same grave.

I’d put this to one side and not followed up with any more research, but a couple of weeks ago I began to search the actual burial records for Basford, looking for any of my ancestors names. I found an Edmund Jowett (died 1908) and a Theresa Hallam (died 1932) in grave 4 of section F1. Theresa had purchased the grave in perpetuity Further on I found Thomas (died 1880) and Henry Jowett (died 1881) in grave 34, section K3.

I thought at first I’d got the wrong family in the memorial inscriptions, but on checking all the dates of death match up and there is no other family in Nottingham with the same names in the census records. I’ve also found a marriage between a Theresa Jowett and John Hallam in Nottingham in 1914 which helps tie things together.

However, I still don’t understand the differences in the records, so I’ll be asking for some help next time I’m at the Nottinghamshire Family History Society meeting as well as ordering the relevant certificates to back up what I hope I’ve found. A visit to Basford Cemetery may also be on the cards!

9ec9e-basford2bcemetery

Thomas May 1819-1874

My 3x Great Grandfather Thomas May seems to have had an eventful life.

Born in Hinckley, Leicestershire in 1819 Thomas was the fourth child of William May & Catherine Townsend.
William was working as a tailor in Castle Street at the time of Thomas’s birth, he later became a master tailor & draper and hosiery manufacturer. He was also a publican and an agent for Royal Exchange Assurance.

In the 1841 census Thomas was working as a warehouseman, previously he had been in a partnership with his father as an insurance agent for Fire & Life.

By 1843 Thomas had followed his father into the hosiery business in Hinckley and had also married Sophia Lapworth, the daughter of John Lapworth and Mary Ann Hunt, in Coventry.

During the next ten years Thomas is noted in the local trade directories as a hosier; by the 1851 census he is a master hosier employing forty men, so obviously doing quite well for himself and his family. At this point he and Sophia have three children; William, Alice and Mary Ann.

Their eldest son, William, was born in Manchester in 1844, which seemed odd, so I researched a little further to find a reason for this. I found that Thomas’s older sister, Elizabeth, had married John Evans in 1833. In the following years John had many varied occupations in different parts of the country, railway porter, inspector of police (I find that a little difficult to believe!), sawyer, labourer and publican. In 1843, Elizabeth and John had a daughter, Catharine, in Manchester, so it’s possible that Thomas and Sophia were with them around this time.

Between the years 1846 and 1854, according to the local directories,Thomas May was also a publican; he had the Star at Stockwell Head in Hinckley.

Stockwell Head, Hinckley

In 1854 Thomas and Sophia had twins, Louisa and Richard Henry, both baptised on the 29th June at St. Mary’s Hinckley. Thomas’s occupation is noted here as hosier and grocer. Sadly, Richard died on the 4th December the same year and was buried at St. Mary’s.

Following this there is no further trace of Thomas in Hinckley. The Star’s landlord in 1855 is John Huston. There is a mention of a Thomas May as a landlord of The Grapes in Leicester in March 1856, but there’s no proof that this is the same man. if it is him, he’s running a disorderly house!

The proof of where Thomas & his family ended up is in the 1861 census. They were living in Dale Street, Sneinton, Nottingham. Thomas was employed as a warehouse man and there was a new addition to the family, a daughter, Julia, born in Nottingham in February 1857. So they must have been in Nottingham by early 1857.

I found a possible mention of Thomas in the newspaper court reports of 1858. It appears that Thomas had bought some shop fixtures from a Mr Slingsby in 1856 that were not actually his to sell. Thomas ended up paying the shop landlord for the items and was attempting to reclaim his money from Slingsby. Thomas lost this case, which may have been quite a blow to the family finances.

If this is the right man then he must have arrived in Nottingham sometime in 1856. I’m reasonably confident that it is him; there are other Thomas Mays living in Nottingham in both the 1851 and 1861 census but none of their occupations fit and my Thomas was working in a warehouse in 1861. He may have been trying to set himself back up in business in his new city.

In 1862, his wife Sophia died aged 42 of a malignant disease of the womb and was buried at St Stephens in Sneinton.

Thomas was an executor of his Uncle Richard May’s will in 1869, he swore an oath in Leicestershire and was described as a hosier living in Belgrave.

In the 1871 census 52 year old Thomas was recorded as a visitor at the Pump Tavern in Aston, Birmingham. His older sister Elizabeth & her husband John Evans were the keepers of the pub.

Thomas’s son, William, had married Emma Carr; they spent a few years in Nottingham and later moved back to Leicestershire. His daughters Alice, Mary Ann, Louisa and Julia remained in Nottingham and were living together in 1871 at High Pavement.

In September of 1871, Thomas married Sophia Staples, a widow, nee Sault, at St Pauls in Aston. John & Elizabeth Evans were the witnesses.

I have been unable to find much information about Thomas’s life after this time. In 1873 his daughter Alice married William Oldknow Oldham in Nottingham and gave her father’s occupation as publican.

Thomas died aged 55 on the 9th August 1874 at the home of his sister, Elizabeth in Belgrave, Leicestershire. Her husband John Evans was present at his death and was the informant. Thomas was buried at St Peters church, Belgrave.

The cause of death was hepatic dropsy; related to the liver and possibly cirrhosis.

I’ve been unable to find out why Thomas & Sophia left Hinckley in 1854/5. It seems quite a fall in status from an employer of 40 men in 1851 to a warehouse man in 1861. The May family did have money; they were landowners in Sutton Cheney, Leicestershire. Thomas’s father, William, had been described as gentry in one local directory, and he owned his own house in Hinckley. Thomas was the eldest surviving son so it would be usual for him to have inherited the majority of his parent’s estate.

I suspect that alcohol may have been part of it exacerbated by his run of bad luck beginning with the death of his infant son in 1854, his loss in status, loss of money in Nottingham and then the death of his wife. His lifelong proximity to alcohol is obvious and the cause of his death most likely alcohol related.

Credits:

Tailor; https://unsplash.com/search/tailor?photo=FQ83tBxftJc 
Stockwell Head; http://www.hinckleytimes.net/news/local-news/appeal-photos-peoples-album-9200190
Richard May death; The Leicester Chronicle. 16 December 1854
The Grapes; Leicester Journal 14 March 1856
May vs Slingsby; Nottingham Daily Guardian, Nottingham October 1858
Sophia Lapworth death; Nottingham Daily Guardian, Nottingham, 24 January 1862
High Pavement Nottingham; my photo
St Pauls Aston; https://familysearch.org/wiki/en/File:Aston_St_Peter_%26_St_Paul_Birmingham.jpg
Thomas May death; Leicester Chronicle and the Leicestershire Mercury August 22, 1874

Military Monday – Harold Richardson

Sunday 3rd July 2016 is the 100th anniversary of the death of my Great-Great Uncle Harold Richardson.

Born in Nottingham in 1881, Harold was the eldest son of Robert Richardson & his wife Sarah (nee Percival). He had joined the army prior to the war, in 1911 he was serving with the Northumberland Fusiliers and based at the Hillsborough Barracks in Sheffield. At the outbreak of war in 1914 he was an acting sergeant with the Fusiliers, number 8434.

Hillsborough Barracks

Most of the following information was kindly supplied by Mel Siddons following a Trent to Trenches event in Nottingham.

The 12th (Service) Battalion The Northumberland Fusiliers was formed at Newcastle in September 1914 as part Kitchener’s Third New Army and joined 62th Brigade, 21st Division. The Division concentrated in the Tring area, training at Halton Park before winter necessitated a move into local billets in Tring, Aylesbury, Leighton Buzzard, High Wycombe and Maidenhead. The artillery was at High Wycombe and Berkhamsted, RE at Chesham, and ASC at Dunstable.

In May 1915 the infantry moved to huts at Halton Park, whilst the artillery moved to Aston Clinton with one brigade staying at Berkhamsted and the RE to Wendover. On the 9th of August they moved to Witley Camp. They proceeded to France during the first week of September and marched across France their first experience of action being in the British assault at Loos on 26th September 1915, suffering heavy casualties, around 3,800, just a few days after arriving in France.

In 1916 they were in action in the Battles of The Somme, including The Battle of Morval in which the Division captured Geudecourt. On the 1st July 1916 the 12th Battalion were fighting in Shelter Wood.

 

At dawn on the 2nd of July our troops advanced to the storm of Fricourt Wood, the Contalmaison Road, Shelter Wood, and as much of the bootshaped plateau as they could take. As they advanced, the massed machine guns in all the trenches and strongholds opened upon them. They got across the field of this fire into Fricourt Wood to an indescribable day which will never be known about nor imagined. They climbed over fallen trees and were caught in branches, and were shot when caught. It took them all day to clear that jungle; but they did clear it, and by dark they were almost out at the northern end, where Railway Alley lay in front of them on the roll of the hill. Further to the north, on the top of the leg of the boot, our men stormed the Shelter Wood and fought in that 200 yards of copse for four bloody and awful hours, with bomb and bayonet, body to body, till the wood was heaped with corpses, but in our hands.*

It is most likely that Harold died in the fighting in Shelter Wood, either in action or later, of his wounds. His body has never been recovered and he is remembered on the Thiepval Memorial.


* ‘The Battle of the Somme’ by John Masefield

Workday Wednesday – Nottingham Lace in Calais

I’ve recently been searching for my Oldham family in Calais, France.

My 3xgreatgrandparents Thomas Oldham and Harriet (nee Winfield) and their sons William and Thomas are missing from the 1861 UK census, but reappear on the 1871 census with five more children, all born in Calais between 1861 and 1870.

The Archives of Pas-de-Calais had already sent me copies of the birth registrations, which reveal the dates and times of their births, both parent’s ages, the mother’s maiden name and the family’s current address – so very useful.

The Calais Archives have digitised many of their records and they are freely available online, unlike the UK’s records. The French took a census every five years from 1836; the 1866 one falls nicely in the middle of the period I’m looking for.

None of the records are indexed, so they aren’t searchable by name, which means finding the correct district and working through it page by page. It’s very time consuming, but well worth it – I found Thomas and his family living on the rue du Jardin des Plantes:

 

Thomas and his eldest son, William, were working as ‘tullistes’. This is a term specific to the Calais area and means a mechanical technician highly specialised in the manufacture of tulle and lace. Thomas and Henriette (Harriet) had six children, William (12) and Thomas (10) who were born in Nottingham and John (7), Eliza (5), Enoch (2) and Anne (2 months) who were born in Calais.

 

From Google Maps

On the same census, just around the corner, I found Gervase Oldham, Thomas’ brother, and his family. They were living on the rue du Temple.

Gervase, or Jervis, also worked as a tulliste and was living with his wife Mary (nee Taylor) and three children, James (3) and Jervas and Eliza (both aged 2 months). The family were back in Nottingham by the 1871 census, but without their daughter Eliza. By this time Gervase and Mary had had another daughter, Eliza Jane born in Calais in 1869, so it’s more than likely that the first Eliza died at a young age.  More trawling through the French records should reveal if that was the case.

Also living with the family was Emma Taylor, an unmarried woman aged 21 who was working as a lace operator. She is likely to be Mary’s younger sister.

So now I’ve filled in the gap in the 1860s for the Oldham family, I need to go back to the French records to see if I can find the births and death in Gervase and Mary’s family.

I’ll also be looking through the French census records to see if Thomas’ and Gervase’s parents, William and Eliza, were living in France without their children around 1851. They are missing from the English census of that year, but their children are in Long Eaton with their grandparents.

Percival Richardson – A Follow-Up

After finding my 2x Great-Uncle Percival Richardson’s marriage to Edith Waby in 1922, the next step was to find a death certificate for him.

I used FreeBMD again, restricting the results to between 1930 and 1975, which fortunately gave only one possible match, in 1965.

When the certificate arrived, it showed that Percival and Edith were living at 72 Belton Road, Hyson Green, Nottingham and that Percival was a retired joiner.

Percival had died in the City Hospital, Nottingham of a number of complaints:
1a Pulmonary oedema
b Congest. left ventricular failure
c Coronary thrombosis
d Uraemia from prostate hypertrophy

I’m not in any rush to Google them to find out the gory details!

I’ve already searched FreeBMD for any possible children without any success, so it’s probable that they didn’t have any.

I may try a search of the local newspapers to see if there are any announcements which would help round out the picture of this family.

Previous Posts:
Wedding Wednesday.
Wedding Wednesday Follow-Up.

 

Great-Great-Grandma Baker – The Story So Far

My Great-Great Grandmother Louisa Baker was born in Wilncote, Kettlebrook Staffordshire on 13th September 1852 and baptised the following December at St. Editha in Tamworth. Her parents were Joseph, a collier and his wife, also Louisa (nee Simnett).

So far, I have found four siblings; Henry b.1849, Rebecca b.1858, William b.1861 and Sarah Ann b.1865. I believe Henry married Ellen Peach and worked as an engine driver in and around Burton-On-Trent. Sarah Ann married Adam Tait and also stayed around the Burton-On-Trent area.

The 1861 census was the first following Louisa’s birth and finds her living in her maternal grandparent’s (Samuel and Ann) home of 29 Guild Street, Burton-On-Trent. She was with her mother and her siblings Henry and William but there was no mention of Rebecca.

According to this census entry Louisa’s father, Joseph, had absconded. I haven’t as yet been able to find him elsewhere in census searches on both Find My Past and Ancestry.

I have also been unable to find Louisa in the 1871 census, but I have located her parents, Louisa and Joseph, back together and living at 2 Albert Place, Station Street, Burton-On-Trent. Henry, Rebecca, William and Sarah Ann were all living with them; Joseph and Henry were employed as labourers.

Station St. Burton-On-Trent c1880

The next record of Louisa I have found is her marriage to Charles Bateman on the 17th October 1874 at St. Nicholas in Nottingham. I have no idea how she ended up in Nottingham; she was living at 24 Castle Terrace at the time and gave no information as to employment.

St. Nicholas. Nottingham

The 1881 census shows Louisa and Charles living at 1 Crown Street, Nottingham with their first two children, Louisa Rose b.1876 and Charles Nelson b.1879. Charles was employed as a telegraphist at the Post Office and Louisa was working as a mantle maker.

The family moved to 138 Noel Street North sometime between 1881-5 and then on to 86 Burford Road, Hyson Green in 1887. 
Louisa and Charles had five more children; Bertie Fawcett b.1882, Margaret Elizabeth (Marguerite) b.1884, Winifred J b.1886, Florence Mary (my g-grandmother) b.1887 and Dorothy Maud b.1892.
By 1891, they were living at 29 Claypole Road, also in Hyson Green and had a visitor, 7 year old Nellie Lamb from Middlesex, staying with them. Louisa Rose, Margaret, Winifred and Florence were living with their parents at this address in 1901.
Claypole Road 2009. John Sutton

Louisa died on the 22nd January 1905 at home in Claypole Road; her death was attributed to cirrhosis of the liver and exhaustion. She was buried in Nottingham’s General Cemetery on the 26th January.

So, I still have some missing information to track down for Louisa; her father’s missing census in 1861 and her own missing census in 1871. I’d like to see who else lived at 24 Castle Terrace in 1871 and what the property was being used for, that may give a clue was to how Louisa ended up in Nottingham. And it may also be useful to find out who Nellie Lamb was and if she is connected to the family.

Station St. Picture Credit: http://www.search.staffspasttrack.org.uk/engine/resource/default.asp?resource=4861

St Nicholas Picture Credit: http://www.nottshistory.org.uk/whatnall1928/stnicholas_church.htm
Claypole Rd. Picture Credit:John Sutton [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons