The Nottingham Jowetts

Following my discoveries in Basford cemetery I took advantage of the PDF trial at the GRO (General Register Office) to order the marriage certificate of my Great-Great-Grandmother Theresa Bates and her second husband John Hallam.

The certificate proved my Grandmother was correct about Theresa’s remarriage; her given name is Jowett & her father’s name is Peter Bates which fits with previous certificates I have found for her.

Hallam & Bates marriage

Theresa’s residence at the time of this marriage was 88 Stanley Road Nottingham; she was living with her son Charles, known as Harold, Jowett & his wife, Florence. They’d only been married for two years, so I wonder what Florence thought to having her mother-in-law living with them?!

I’m now waiting for three further certificates relating to this branch of my family tree so hopefully they will back up the information I’ve already found.

Mystery Monday – The Jowetts in Basford Cemetery

I haven’t done a great deal of research into the Jowett side of my family up to yet, other than a basic gathering of names from the Census and a handful of certificates.

Browsing in the Nottinghamshire Archives some time ago I came across a memorial inscription in Basford cemetery, Nottingham for my 2x Great-grandparents Edmund Jowett and his wife Theresa (nee Bates). It records the deaths of Edmund in 1908, his wife Theresa in 1932 and two of their sons, Thomas and Henry, who sadly both died at the age of five just over a year apart.

I was puzzled by the reference to Theresa as I can 270d6a1964b744cf0682321e3b9518bd600c47d67e6945f888ed6a08c827fa38remember my Grandmother telling me that Theresa had remarried and that she “wasn’t a Jowett when she died.” I assumed (never a good thing in genealogy!) that Theresa had been buried under the name Jowett and had therefore not remarried at all. Also all four burials share the same reference number: 1185 so I’d assumed (again!) that they were in the same grave.

I’d put this to one side and not followed up with any more research, but a couple of weeks ago I began to search the actual burial records for Basford, looking for any of my ancestors names. I found an Edmund Jowett (died 1908) and a Theresa Hallam (died 1932) in grave 4 of section F1. Theresa had purchased the grave in perpetuity Further on I found Thomas (died 1880) and Henry Jowett (died 1881) in grave 34, section K3.

I thought at first I’d got the wrong family in the memorial inscriptions, but on checking all the dates of death match up and there is no other family in Nottingham with the same names in the census records. I’ve also found a marriage between a Theresa Jowett and John Hallam in Nottingham in 1914 which helps tie things together.

However, I still don’t understand the differences in the records, so I’ll be asking for some help next time I’m at the Nottinghamshire Family History Society meeting as well as ordering the relevant certificates to back up what I hope I’ve found. A visit to Basford Cemetery may also be on the cards!

9ec9e-basford2bcemetery

Wordless Wednesday – Great Aunt Joy’s Albums.

Another handful of photos from Great Aunt Joy’s albums. These date from around 1938-1939.

 

Baby Joy & Chummy
Derek (aged 6) & Margaret (aged 4)

 

Bubbles at Lulworth Cove 1939
Two Joys at Lulworth
Little Moira Holland aged 2

 

Margaret & Mrs Tatham

Thankful Thursday

I’m very thankful for a large parcel that arrived one day last week.
I’ve posted before about my Great Aunt Joy who emigrated to Australia – she gave me a Nottingham lace bedspread some years ago, which was designed by her Grandfather William Bucknall.
Sadly Auntie Joy passed away in July last year at the grand age of 90. She and her husband, Don, my grandmother’s brother, had enjoyed a fantastic life in Australia, making many new friends along the way.
It was one of these friends that was kind enough to send me today’s parcel which contains Joy & Don’s photo albums.
I’m over the moon to receive them, especially as they all seem to be dated and labelled with both names and places.
I’m intending to scan the most relevant ones and share them with the rest of the family (whether they like it or not!) via Dropbox.

Workday Wednesday – Nottingham Lace Part II

Following on from my last post which mentioned my heirloom Nottingham lace bedspread, I have managed to find out a little more about William Bucknall, the man who designed it.

The son of William Bucknall and Henrietta Litchfield, William Jnr was born in Radford, Nottingham in 1861. Both his father William Snr and his paternal grandfather George were lacemakers from Beeston.

William Jnr’s early years were spent in Radford, first on Fairfield Street, then Highhurst Street and then on to Denman Street.

On the 18th September 1884 William Jnr married Ann Elizabeth Gell at the Tennyson Street Methodist Chapel in Nottingham and they began their married life at 24 Radford Boulevard later moving to no. 114. By this time William was employed as a lace draughtsman.

They had two children, Clarence William born 4th June 1885 and Annie Louisa Lillian born 19th July 1887. Both children were baptised at the Deligne (or De Ligne) Street Wesleyan Methodist Chapel, which was quite close to Canning Circus in Nottingham.

 

Over the following years the family lived at Berridge Road, Lenton Boulevard and Gregory Avenue; all in Nottingham.

According to my Great Aunt Joy, who is Clarence’s daughter, William worked at the Flersheim lace factory in the Lace Market from around 1891 until his retirement in 1928. Looking back through the various Nottingham directories, I found William listed as a lace draughtsman between 1891 and 1901.

Between 1910 and 1928 he worked a a lace designer. Joy can recall being told that one of his designs, which may or may not have been the bedspread, was displayed at either a London department store or at a large London exhibition. I haven’t yet been able to locate this.

Their last address was 74 Lenton Boulevard, where William’s wife, Annie, died on the 14th March 1935 and William himself died on the 14th September 1937.

Flersheim’s factory eventually closed on 25th July 1964 and was demolished to make way for a new ring road.

 

Joy inherited the lace bedspread and took it to Australia with her when she emigrated with her husband, Don Jowett, in the 1960s. A few years ago she very kindly offered it to me and it travelled back to England, where it is now being carefully looked after.




Picture Credit Denman St; Picture The Past
Picture Credit Radford Blvd; Google Street View
Picture Credit Deligne St; Nottstalgia
Picture Credit Lenton Blvd; Google Street View

Travel Tuesday – Francis/Frank Jowett

I can remember my Grandmother telling me about her Uncle Frank emigrating to Canada when she was quite young.  He worked on the Canadian Pacific Railway for many years, a fact she was very proud of.

I noticed recently that both Ancestry and Find My Past have very detailed ships’ passenger lists available so I thought I’d see if I could find details of his journey. Find My Past only have outgoing passenger details, but Ancestry also have incoming, so I could track any return journeys.

Uncle Frank (my 2x great Uncle) was born Francis Albert Jowett in Nottingham in 1894 and was the youngest of eight siblings. His parents were Edmund Jowett a Nottingham lace maker and Theresa Bates.

His father Edmund died when Frank was just fourteen in 1904 and in the 1911 census he was living with his mother Theresa, his brother Charles (my great grandfather), his married sister Mabel and two of her children, his nieces. Frank was working as a card lacer in a lace factory.

I have no idea what made Frank head off to Canada at the age of thirty-three, but he left from Liverpool on the 17th March 1922 on the Minnedosa. He gave his last residence as England, Haydn Road in Nottingham, and his intended future residence as Canada, so it was obviously his intention to emigrate permanently. He gave his occupation as ‘agent’.

Frank next appeared in the records on the 8th March 1924 as he arrived back in Liverpool on the Montclare.  He had travelled from New Brunswick in Canada with his wife, Amelia. Frank gave Haydn Road in Nottingham as his intended address whilst staying in the UK, so it appears he had brought his wife home to introduce her to the family. They left for Canada on the 9th May 1924, again on the Montclare from Liverpool. Frank stated his occupation as a telegraph operator at this time.

Frank and Amelia returned once more to England on the 16th June 1935, this time accompanied by their nine year old daughter Marguerite. They again stayed in Nottingham until their return to Canada on the 10th August 1935, leaving from Southampton on the Empress of Britain.

I’m not sure if they ever came back to England after this visit. I know my Grandmother always regretted not having taken the opportunity to visit this branch of the family in Canada and she was in touch with Marguerite for quite a few years but the correspondence petered out eventually over the years.

So if you know any Canadian Jowetts, or you are a Canadian Jowett with Nottingham roots, drop me a line, I’d love to hear from you!




Picture Credits:
http://www.canadiandesignresource.ca/type-typography/the-canadian-pacific-railway-poster/
http://www.greatships.net/minnedosa.html
http://digitalpostercollection.com/?attachment_id=56706

Workday Wednesday – Nottingham Lace Makers

If you have traced your ancestors back to Nottingham in the census years of 1841 to 1911, it is highly likely that you will have come across lace making as an occupation.

My three main lace making families are the Oldhams, who worked in Calais during the 1860s as well as Nottingham, the Jowetts and the Bucknalls.

Looking through the census returns for these families, they did many different jobs within the lace industry, such as; ‘mender’, ‘threader’, ‘draughtsman’, ‘clipper’, ‘manufacturer’, ‘winder’, and ‘warehouseman.’ Not having any personal knowledge of the industry, I wasn’t sure exactly what these different jobs entailed, so I was delighted to find a book of memoirs written by a local author, Mark Ashfield, who was employed in the lace industry.

I found it a very enjoyable read, with detailed description of life in a Nottingham lace factory – the hours, conditions, skills and works outings. It’s available here both in paperback and for Kindle.

Another book which I’ve found really useful is Sheila Mason’s ‘Nottingham Lace 1760s – 1950s’, my Oldhams even get a small mention!  It’s available both via Amazon and Abebooks unfortunately at quite a price.  There may be reprinted copies available at the Nottingham branch of Waterstones, where I found my copy, for £25.

I think genealogy can be so much more than just gathering a list of names and dates.  If you can fill in the background, where they lived, how they worked, it can give you a much fuller picture of their lives.