Motivation Monday – Top Ten for 2016

My genealogy ‘to-dos’ are numerous & I never seem to make much progess, probably because I’m too easily distracted by those pesky shaking leaves* on Ancestry!

So I’ve decided to list the top ten things I could really do with getting to the bottom of and hope that a list will keep me focussed!

 

  1. Finish searching the French online records for my Oldham family in Calais. The Census and Birth/Marriage/Death records are all freely available online. I’ve found the family in 1866, but also need to look further back to see if the previous generation spent time there and also if any of them went to Australia.
  2. Transcribe sections of Joseph Woolley’s diary and finish reading/copying the remainder at the Nottingham Archives. Continuing with the Oldham family, but this time in Clifton, Nottinghamshire. Joseph Woolley was a framework knitter from Clifton, as well as his own business his diary documents he commented on his neighbours and local events. I need to transcribe the pages I’ve already photographed and finish reading the remaining sections in the Archives.
  3. Finish checking the Methodist records at the Nottinghamshire Archives. I’m mostly looking for Oldhams in these records, but other family names have cropped up too.
  4. Make use of the Nottinghamshire Family History Society’s research room. To find more Oldham information, specifically Thomas Oldknow Oldham’s birth/baptism around 1834. Also check their online databases.
  5. Finish reading Percy Richardson’s war diary and finish the blog posts.
  6. Tidy and reorganise documents, certificate and books. Before ordering any more!
  7. Check out parish records on Find My Past. Look for my May family in Frant, Sussex from 1600 working backwards.
  8. Visit some local churchyards to look for gravestones. Sawley, Moira, Donisthorpe, Church Wilne, Draycott, Basford, Ashby-de-la-Zouch & others aren’t too far away to visit and record any memorial inscriptions.
  9. Look for tithe maps and census information for Pilsley. To find out who lived in and/or owned my late father-in-law’s farmhouse.
  10. Start scanning photos. I received a Doxie Flip as a Christmas present so I’m intending to scan and share many of my photos.

So – lots to do!

*if you have your family tree uploaded to Ancestry, they kindly add a little ‘shaking leaf’ to any family member they may have records available for, which is usually enough to distract me from doing what I’d orginally logged on to do in the first place!

Workday Wednesday – Nottingham Lace in Calais

I’ve recently been searching for my Oldham family in Calais, France.

My 3xgreatgrandparents Thomas Oldham and Harriet (nee Winfield) and their sons William and Thomas are missing from the 1861 UK census, but reappear on the 1871 census with five more children, all born in Calais between 1861 and 1870.

The Archives of Pas-de-Calais had already sent me copies of the birth registrations, which reveal the dates and times of their births, both parent’s ages, the mother’s maiden name and the family’s current address – so very useful.

The Calais Archives have digitised many of their records and they are freely available online, unlike the UK’s records. The French took a census every five years from 1836; the 1866 one falls nicely in the middle of the period I’m looking for.

None of the records are indexed, so they aren’t searchable by name, which means finding the correct district and working through it page by page. It’s very time consuming, but well worth it – I found Thomas and his family living on the rue du Jardin des Plantes:

 

Thomas and his eldest son, William, were working as ‘tullistes’. This is a term specific to the Calais area and means a mechanical technician highly specialised in the manufacture of tulle and lace. Thomas and Henriette (Harriet) had six children, William (12) and Thomas (10) who were born in Nottingham and John (7), Eliza (5), Enoch (2) and Anne (2 months) who were born in Calais.

 

From Google Maps

On the same census, just around the corner, I found Gervase Oldham, Thomas’ brother, and his family. They were living on the rue du Temple.

Gervase, or Jervis, also worked as a tulliste and was living with his wife Mary (nee Taylor) and three children, James (3) and Jervas and Eliza (both aged 2 months). The family were back in Nottingham by the 1871 census, but without their daughter Eliza. By this time Gervase and Mary had had another daughter, Eliza Jane born in Calais in 1869, so it’s more than likely that the first Eliza died at a young age.  More trawling through the French records should reveal if that was the case.

Also living with the family was Emma Taylor, an unmarried woman aged 21 who was working as a lace operator. She is likely to be Mary’s younger sister.

So now I’ve filled in the gap in the 1860s for the Oldham family, I need to go back to the French records to see if I can find the births and death in Gervase and Mary’s family.

I’ll also be looking through the French census records to see if Thomas’ and Gervase’s parents, William and Eliza, were living in France without their children around 1851. They are missing from the English census of that year, but their children are in Long Eaton with their grandparents.

Back to the Nottingham Oldhams

I still haven’t been able to locate either William Henry Oldham or Thomas Oldknow Oldham in the local baptism records, although the Census records suggest they were both born in Nottingham.

The next step will be to find the non-conformist registers and see if they are in there.  I know there are some at the Nottingham Archives, it’s a matter of finding the right one!

A couple of years ago I was in touch with Gillian Kelly via her website here.  She has done extensive research on the Nottingham lacemakers who went to Calais and then later emigrated to Australia.  Although my Oldhams weren’t in Calais at the time of her research (they were there later) she did manage to find a baptism in her records of a Gervase Oldham on the 25th May 1842 in the Methodist Chapel in Calais.  His parents were William Oldham & Eliza Oldknow.

This does fit in with my Oldhams, and I do have a record of a Gervase born in 1842 to parents of the same name, but according to his birth certificate he was born in Beeston, Nottinghamshire on the 25th August!

Back to the records I think!